Cybertruck 2022

CarlDry

New Member
Jan 5, 2019
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My dad had a remote that did everything....

Mum has it easy since he passed.

Things change....my get back is telling my broken remote to put the toilet lid down as well as the seat....
 

millers

Active Member
Mar 25, 2011
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Adelaide
Could you please explain the % in the last paragraph, i cannot follow the logic.
Thanks
Terry
Hi Terry, I quickly looked up the efficiency of charging stations and it is 80%. That means that remote sites will need to supply 125% more power than the cars that they are charging. 1kwHr battery in a car will need 1.25kwHr to charge it. So remote sites as well as running their own power will need to produce the power to charge all cars that need it plus 25% more. If connected to the grid then it is a transmission issue, but if not it is a generation issue.
 

Drover

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Nov 7, 2013
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I wonder how much power reserve is available in places like Winton etc, if the caravan parks there all fitted fast chargers (drawing the power of an AC) to their sites how would the supply handle the extra load of a couple of hundred AC's running along with the normal town draw, at present not a hope, same for outback roadhouses they may have 3 phase but that is often coming from a transformer which is rated to cover what they need usually drawing from a line which is near max load anyway and the addition of chargers for vehicles and that would mean a dozen or more at least I very much doubt things happening while the grid is in its current form, many stations and properties are supplied by a single 440kva line which as the distance gets longer the supply drops away, brown outs are common and since these are paid for by the owners along with transformer at many thousands of $$$ again I doubt the EV will take off, solar for pumps and things is great but the energy required to charge up a fleet of various types of vehicles would require station owners to outlay an enormous amount and the same with roadhouse and parks, the charges to recoup these costs would certainly put travel out of the realm of many I would think and while I believe one day it will come in some degree it won't be a day I will see thats for sure...... We don't have the generator capacity.

Cars lined up at places for a power point and I see NSW is looking at ways to charge EV's a levy, I envisage a distance levy similar to the Diesel tax in NZ....

In Canberra, winter at tea time I had to stop using my welder because the power supply had dropped off that much, welding wasn't possible and if I had my plug in device like now I would see the supply would be way below the 240v, folks were sucking too hard on the electric straw and the bottle was near empty and unless they build a few Nuclear power stations to supply heaps of green steam !!!!!!!!!! ................ thats unless we die of thirst because a few more dams for water is more important than some EV's.
 
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Crusty181

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Feb 7, 2010
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These are just the type of questions and answers that I hoped would come from starting this forum.

My take is:

The Gibb River road is under 700km with several fuel stops along it. The plenty Highway has Tobermoray, Harts Range, Gemtree and Jervois which are fuel stops plus the Great Central Road has some good fuel stops, it is not too far between fuel stops and most of them currently have 3 phase power and almost certainly will get EV charging, even it is for their own vehicles as transporting diesel is expensive to these remote places. Certainly the Canning Stock Route is a problem, but I am not planning on towing along it.

We already stop for fuel when towing along these types of roads and we do not mostly travel on these remote roads towing full size vans (I have done 2 of the above 3 with my van in the last 3 years). The remote fuel stops and stations mostly have electricity often solar and some with wind so it is very logical they will be happy to sell electricity, major roads and highways are rapidly getting fast chargers, destination chargers and most show grounds and van parks would be happy to sell electricity to charge your vehicle.

The jerry can point is interesting, both Rivian and Tesla have announced they will have smaller extra batteries you can supplement the fitted battery with "electric" jerry cans. What these cost and how they will work we will have to wait to see.

Running out of charge is like running out of diesel again both Rivian and Tesla have announced you will eventually be able to charge one of their trucks form another truck, kinda "electronic" syphoning fuel. Again we will have to wait and see how well this works.

Also something diesel cannot do than an EV can you can charge from any 10Amp, 15Amp or 3 phase outlet so you have a fuel stop where ever you have electricity. Slow refuelling, but ubiquitous fuel. Also charge times are 30-60 min at the moment with fast chargers, but this is improving and I am sure most EVs will charge overnight at roadhouses, showgrounds and van parks. Also you charge at home and if you have solar mostly for free leaving home each time with a full fuel tank (charge) would be nice.

"Times are a changing" much will happen in the next 5 years with battery technology and charging it will impact on us caravan towing.
The Gibb is 700km with one reliable fuel stop, and that fuel stop relies on a diesel generator for power .... oh, the irony !!!!
 

Crusty181

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Feb 7, 2010
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Change is coming, looks like no more diesel Landcrusier.

Petrol Hybrid 300 series Landcrusier.

toyota-landcruiser-3-5l-hybrid-to-be-revealed-in-august

Either Cybertruck, Rivian, Bollinger, F150 Electric or petrol hybrid Landcrusier or just Nissan petrol look like the choices in 2022 for good tow vehicle.
new Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA)platform known as TNGA-CV. Im certainly convinced ...... nah Im just BS'in ya, catchy acronyms generally disguise BS, i know cause i use em

With such a radical new design, tech, and unknowns etc jambed in a single $100k new car i think I be waiting it out for the 5th of 6th generation before i took a punt.
 

yabbietol

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Sep 2, 2014
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God help us

We are but the play things of the gods.

We have no car industry so we have to accept whatever other countries manufacture. We have almost the worst quality fuel in the world and despite it destroying our 4WDs we have no alternative, except to either move on with new technology or give up our weekends and travels with 3.5 tonne caravans as our old 4WDs die.


We need to look a the new options for tows and work out which ones will suit our individual needs, by 2022 it will be very different.
 
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Boots in Action

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Mar 13, 2017
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new Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA)platform known as TNGA-CV. Im certainly convinced ...... nah Im just BS'in ya, catchy acronyms generally disguise BS, i know cause i use em

With such a radical new design, tech, and unknowns etc jambed in a single $100k new car i think I be waiting it out for the 5th of 6th generation before i took a punt.

@Crusty181, looks like you will be the first to get into a Dodge Ram 1500 to pull your rig, just as @Drover has been saying. Or maybe a Ford Silverardo?
 

Drover

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Nov 7, 2013
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The car industry in Australia never catered for the vehicles that I wanted so never bought any and it seems many other felt the same otherwise we would still have one also our fuel standard doesn't meet the European Standard and is classed as dirty because of what comes out the exhaust, the reason trotted out by refineries doesn't really wash as we import most of our fuel already refined, as for destroying FWD's other than when BP changed its fuel many years ago and all the seals fell apart I haven't heard of any engines destroyed by our fuel other than the emissions crap thats been fitted............. Dirty fuel to me means fuel thats has crud in it, dust, water, bugs, thinners.

By the time I could afford to buy a Lecky Car they will be sprouting the next brilliant mode of transport..........
 

mfexpanda

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Apr 1, 2011
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We are but the play things of the gods.

We have no car industry so we have to accept whatever other countries manufacture. We have almost the worst quality fuel in the world and despite it destroying our 4WDs we have no alternative, except to either move on with new technology or give up our weekends and travels with 3.5 tonne caravans as our old 4WDs die.


We need to look a the new options for tows and work out which ones will suit our individual needs, by 2022 it will be very different.
I’ll be honest as I can . They can keep their electric cars I have no interest in them at all.
But as you said will we have a choice only time will tell and if they try and feed us what we don’t want maybe they will go broke
 
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Drover

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It is a worry how many variations of motive power, storage etc will be brought out until something will be found that will be used all round the place and suitable for the city and rural areas, each area having there own special challenges, now they all seem practical for a city large town environment but if they end up sorting out the power supply problems for the rural areas that will bring more than silent running vehicles, stable power supplies to many town will be such a boon, no brown outs or big gennies running a lot, solar farms the size of cattle stations and greenies chained to wind farm towers keeping them away from the farmers animals.................... and as for a Jeep Wrangler like that I would say its for the Latte set not for any serious off road, carrying a lot for extra for little practical gain especially as the more electrical the more problems for the real off road settings, a Telegraph Track run would be scary in one I think.

As for banning diesel it will still be needed for ships, trains, diesel back up gennies and heavy haulage for many years to come and oil refining won't cease either.
 
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yabbietol

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Sep 2, 2014
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1126984_electric-payload-these-5-trucks-will-change-america

1. More change happening above link a good summary of what is coming from the US in the next year and likely next 2-3 years in Australia.


2. The new Landcrusier LC300 will be a hybrid, with probably a petrol engine. The petrol engine would make it less desirable, might have a diesel, but not likely, time will tell?


3. Rivian looks like been out in US before end of 2020 and it looks awesome though a lot more expensive than Cybertruck.

Rivian similar to big US pick up $ maybe even more $.

https://cleantechnica.com/2020/02/07/rivian-primed-for-lift-off-in-2020/



Electric 4WD vehicles will soon be the norm and we will wonder what happened to those expensive to maintain diesels, that we had problems getting clean fuel for in Australia. It will be nice not to be held hostage by foreign owned tax avoiding petroleum producers who only have 12 days worth of diesel reserves held in Australia.

Solar power is growing rapidly and more I travel in remote Australia the more I see solar on roofs, solar bore pumps and solar power in remote communities, many road houses are now getting more solar power as it it cheaper than diesel generators. A recent survey of EV owners in Australian found most (75%) charged their cars at home and left home with a full charge plus the majority did most of their charging on their home solar.

We will find as more we travel there will be more and more solar powered chargers especially in remote communities, Solar is a lot cheaper than trucking in diesel.Solar power with firming (batteries, etc.) is now on $ parity (or cheaper depending on location) with building new power generation, solar is only more expensive when you already have installed your diesel generator still working, it is now cheaper to replace a worn out generator with firmed solar.

I would not be too concerned with charging my EV in the next 2-3 years, it will just require a bit of planning, just like buying fuel.

sylvia-70-completes-round-australia-trip-in-an-ev-for-150-90

round-aust-list

charge-stations-in-australia
 

millers

Active Member
Mar 25, 2011
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There is no doubt that electric vehicles are gaining momentum and for around town with charging from solar at home may become cost effective. I beleive that currently the limited number means that there is not the strain on the outback re-charging. From a quick look the Tesla is a 100kWh battary pack. That is 84 100ah (12V) battaries. The reason for mentioning this is to provide the details of how much solar / storage you will need per vehicle at a charging station. Lets do 50 vehicles a day, that is 4,200 (12V 100ah) batteries to be recharged daily.

You then need to add the caravan towing capacity and the australian towing experience.

Do not get me wrong that electic is not a good option. Ships, trains, mine machinary have being using diesel / electric for years and the torque curves are great. But while a small percentage of travellers going around Australia can charge now with no real problem, the infra-structure to do it for every vehicle is not going to be a cheap exercise. And I have not even added in the electic trucks, which are 300kWh with a 260 km range.

Does this mean a change to our life style where we ditch the caravan and be motel hoppers, because that fits with the electic way of life. I think I will need to do my lap soon so as to avoid this option. I may not be able to pay for it other wise.
 

Drover

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Be interesting to see how and where they will put the charging stations at Rainbow Beach, Pop 1000, which in holiday times can expand to 4 or 5,000, there isn't enough parking in the place now or land spare, all wanting refuelling daily as they burn up and down 70km of beach, they also camp on the beach not in town so no power points for overnighters and an electric FWD on Fraser Island to recharge would be interesting, thinking a big trailer covered in panels with a diesel genny and I sell power to the cashed up tourists as a days sand driving would burn thru their batteries like napalm, could also drag it to Birdsville for the races and Big Red, make a fortune as there wont be any charging stations out there, at least until we build the reactor out at Boulia to power Western QLD.......
Its just going to be interesting to see how it evolves, the vehicles are the easy bit making it work all over Australia will be the challenge........
 
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