Chassis Weight Distribution Hitch Video

Matty4

Well-Known Member
Mar 18, 2011
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Wandin North, Vic
#4
Yep.................easiest explanation I've seen yet.
Great demonstration too.

I've always been an advocate of a WDH, even with my car having 3.5T towing and 350kg ball weight allowances. It isn't about that, it's about the weight transfer back onto the front axle, promoting better braking, steering and handling.

It has nothing to do with it looking level, so therefore I don't need a WDH
 

Bluey

Well-Known Member
Mar 31, 2014
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#5
that's why I have one my car is now way over tow limits for the van 3.5 car 2.5 van but still have a hitch and air bags in both my cruiser and prado
 
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Crusty181

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Feb 7, 2010
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#6
I know Im risking wide spread condemnation, and Im certainly not trying to cause anyones blood pressure to raise; in fact I would love to get the good oil from a expert on these things from a holistic approach, with vested interests aside. Im not convinced its quite as simple as Hayman Reece suggests. I can see the basic physics of what the guys says and on face value it clearly has some positive effects in certain conditions ... but there is a major link in the component chain that seems to be conveniently and repeatedly overlooked in the sales pitch; the thing that the WDH attached to i.e. the tow bar and ultimately (and more importantly) the cars chassis. The manufacturer of the car (in my case Nissan) say "our cars are not designed to cope with the stresses that a WDH applies to the vehicle, so don't use it" ... yet Hayman Reece have forge ahead regardless.

The WDH to my mind it seems to be a great idea, but unfortunately one of the key components for the thing to operate is made by a completely different manufacturer who couldn't care less about the existence of WDH's, and who's has never considered the significant forces it applies to an area of the car that has never been designed to deal with such force. Just my thoughts

(ill probably learn to regret posting this ....... :faint: Im hiding under the couch)
 
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davemc

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Oct 29, 2013
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Viewbank, Victoria
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#8
Interesting I had a discussion with someone who towed for a while regarding our Disco. With the suspension you Land Rover say do not use a WDH, although I know a few people who use one and say it makes things better. With the auto level suspension not sure exactly how you think WDH would fight it. I know when we stopped at drive through sites the car wakes up every 30 mins or so and re levels itself even with the key removed. Freaked me out the first time.

If the manufacture says no pretty hard to go against it. Saying that if we moved from the Disco I pretty sure we buy one.
 

Bluey

Well-Known Member
Mar 31, 2014
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#11
I know Im risking wide spread condemnation, and Im certainly not trying to cause anyones blood pressure to raise; in fact I would love to get the good oil from a expert on these things from a holistic approach, with vested interests aside. Im not convinced its quite as simple as Hayman Reece suggests. I can see the basic physics of what the guys says and on face value it clearly has some positive effects in certain conditions ... but there is a major link in the component chain that seems to be conveniently and repeatedly overlooked in the sales pitch; the thing that the WDH attached to i.e. the tow bar and ultimately (and more importantly) the cars chassis. The manufacturer of the car (in my case Nissan) say "our cars are not designed to cope with the stresses that a WDH applies to the vehicle, so don't use it" ... yet Hayman Reece have forge ahead regardless.

The WDH to my mind it seems to be a great idea, but unfortunately one of the key components for the thing to operate is made by a completely different manufacturer who couldn't care less about the existence of WDH's, and who's has never considered the significant forces it applies to an area of the car that has never been designed to deal with such force. Just my thoughts

(ill probably learn to regret posting this ....... :faint: Im hiding under the couch)
@Crusty181 I don't know anything about Nissans can I say maybe there mounts for tow bar arnt strong enough ????? and they know that don't know but its strange are there other makers that dont like hitches I know not so good on self levelling cars
well someone had to say something :behindsofa: you should follow @Holden_man s lead mmmmmm Toyota
 

dagree

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2012
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Perth. WA
#15
Swapped mine to a HR one just in case.... Toyota dealer here said original was OK to use with WDH and the put a sticker on it (And in handbook) stating "Toyota take no responsibility if non genuine Toyota weight bars are used!!!!!!!" :o
 

Crusty181

Well-Known Member
Feb 7, 2010
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Mentone, VIC
#16
Swapped mine to a HR one just in case.... Toyota dealer here said original was OK to use with WDH and the put a sticker on it (And in handbook) stating "Toyota take no responsibility if non genuine Toyota weight bars are used!!!!!!!" :o
The so called geniune (Reece supplied) Nissan tow bars pre 2010 were peeling the chassis open due to poor design. Nissan only inspected and chassis repaired the dealer installed bars ... leaving everyone else to fend for them selves. Bit crappy
 
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Crusty181

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Feb 7, 2010
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#17
@Crusty181 I don't know anything about Nissans can I say maybe there mounts for tow bar arnt strong enough ????? and they know that don't know but its strange are there other makers that dont like hitches I know not so good on self levelling cars
well someone had to say something :behindsofa: you should follow @Holden_man s lead mmmmmm Toyota
"Da da da dada .... i dont think so"

Besides @Bluey that makes no sense. Follow HOLDENmans lead ...... and buy a TOTOTA. Your not instilling me with confidence, with the loyalty confusion
 
May 13, 2011
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Sydney
#18
On my new Nav and the latest Nissans they don't say don't use a WDH, now they say
"Nissan is not able to make any recommendation on the use or suitability of load-levelling or weight distribution devices to be fitted to the vehicle".
When i got my NP300 i went to put the HR hitch on and it won't fit the hole. Nissan have mad the corners of the square hitch with a curve. I got out the grinder and took about 1mm of each corner and it fitted. I had towed originally with out the WDH as it didn't fit. It towed well although the rear springs in the new nav are soft so it was a little bouncy over speed humps etc. But when i got the WDH to fit, the car became very bounce but in a hard way. Like a leaf spring empty ride. It made it worse. Maybe something to do with the new rear suspension on the Navs, so we got about 10klms up the road and took the bars off, back to a nice ride again.
I will install some upgrade springs in the nav and not use the WDH. Like most new utes the factory springs are $h1t.
 

Drover

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Nov 7, 2013
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Cooloola Coast, QLD
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#19
Have to agree with @Crusty181.
Vehicles like Jeeps don't have a chassis and having had a tow bar pull away from the body on one I wouldn't want to add to the stress of normal towing. The smash repairer told me it happens a lot on Monoque bodies.
So when I went shopping for new truck a chassis was top of list as well as big GVM.
 

Crusty181

Well-Known Member
Feb 7, 2010
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Mentone, VIC
#20
Have to agree with @Crusty181.
Vehicles like Jeeps don't have a chassis and having had a tow bar pull away from the body on one I wouldn't want to add to the stress of normal towing. The smash repairer told me it happens a lot on Monoque bodies.
I got the same monoque story from Pedders ... along with a short list of the worst of the bendable chassis utes that they shouldnt be put on