Chassis Weight Distribution Hitch Video

Sammy D

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Feb 14, 2016
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#61
When we bought our commodore back in 2011 it had two tow options and going from memory they were 1600kg and 2500kg (those figures could be way off but they seem to ring a bell) the only difference was if you wanted the higher weight you got a WDH.

We don't tow often with it (used to use our trusty Pajero and now have a cruiser) but when we did it was a very noticable difference between using the WDH and not using it. Even with just a little well balanced box trailer the WDH was miles in front.

Having said that we have never used one with either our old Pajero or the cruiser and never had any issues but can see that in some situations they would be handy.



The thing that worries me is there is no free lunch. Someone earlier mentioned that a WDH was only basic physics and was just moving weight from one axle to another which is correct BUT it is also basic physics that that does NOT happen without exerting an equal force to something to do it and what concerns me is that those kgs are moved say nearly 2 metres (the distance between front and rear axles) by a 1 metre lever which would seem to me (and my basic understanding of physics) that the kg force put on the ball would have to be significantly bigger than the kgs that are moved to the front axle. Obviously that isn't a problem if it has all been designed to take it but I still think about it.

I would love to see a little load cell put underneath a towball (between the towball and the tow tongue) to see just how much downforce was put on it when using a solid WDH.


Anyway I am hoping to get some airbags for the cruiser (arb now have in cab controls for inflate/deflate which seems pretty lazy but also sort of cool!) and will weigh up (excuse the pun) whether or not I need a WDH on the day we pickup the van. I think they have their place but only after carefully adding up the pros and cons.
 

davemc

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Oct 29, 2013
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#63
Interesting thing with that video as we have been looking at a Mux. Isuzu do not recommend WDH and from reading you have to modify the hitch to get it to work with the stock towbar.. Although Hayman have the Mux on their vid as if you fit with a Hayman Reece bar all fits nicely.
 
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Bushman

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Nov 9, 2010
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#67
Interesting thing with that video as we have been looking at a Mux. Isuzu do not recommend WDH and from reading you have to modify the hitch to get it to work with the stock towbar.. Although Hayman have the Mux on their vid as if you fit with a Hayman Reece bar all fits nicely.
Yep they dont recommend it with their factory towbar as they haven't test it and as you said it needs modifing to fit
Use a Hayman Reece bar and no issue.
 
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Drover

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Nov 7, 2013
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#68
@Drover yes most important to keep things balanced. Bullbar and winch is a much more versatile option than a wdh. At least you can use them without the van.
I don't think the finance controller would release funds, so its a WDH or a big bag of sand on the bull bar..........I wonder if a BIG ChevyV8 instead of the baby oiler would weigh it down..
 
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Drover

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Nov 7, 2013
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#71
Hooked Big Mal up for a WDH test run this weekend so I can make sure all is set up good for when it becomes home next month, so as I move it to beside the shed onto hard stuff (been raining a bit need FWD to escape yard) some DH forgot to drop the TV aerial so quick repairs need before run (noted on Big Mal thread).

Anyway I hooked up the WDH need to do a proper set up on really flat stuff but gee the bars hang down a bit, does this look right to you fellas ????
They hang down a lot................or are they too short, also does the hanger just lock into position with the pin just to make sure it stays there ??



hitch.jpg
 

dagree

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Mar 3, 2012
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#72
Does look a bit low @Drover ... Not sure if you got the instructions with it but they can be found HERE.

It doesn't mention a maximum number of links but does make mention of a minimum of four working links and a minimum of 125mm from ground level to end of the bars.
Section 5 of "Determining Correct Chain Link" gives instructions for lengthening the chains...... Maybe if you did it the other way it may help to shorten the number of links and raise the bars a bit?????????
 
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Drover

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#74
Full water tanks, set up redone properly, I think ?..............ute dropped 15mm at hitch and rose 27mm at the front, set up hitch onto link 7 and it's back to where it was unhitched, thought I may have had to relocate the jockey but missed by that much.

I think this looks better now..................
WDH2.jpg



pin chain.jpg .....Could see some fun times ..NOT...with these pins so found some small chain to save stress later on....
 
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Dean Anderson

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Feb 7, 2014
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Isaac Region
#77
I'm one for not using if possible.
My old car had chassis problems so I may be biased with respect to changing chassis setup.

When I did use them on the Prado they both levelled the car (better steering) and made the ride more comfortable. The bouncing after road undulations almost didn't exist. That being the case the forces were somewhere, and I would say in the chassis where the car manufacturer didn't design them to be.

The car-to-van line will be kept rigid (no bounce) with a WDH.

The suspension and points where the suspension attaches to the chassis will receive forces greater than without a WDH because the vehicle doesn't bounce.


No WDH you can feel what's going on. I believe that if your steering is OK don't use them. If your steering isn't try to upgrade the rear suspension in a way that the car was designed.

They hang so low that a lot of free camping is impossible too.

And besides I'm too lazy to put them on and take them off within manufacturers recommendations. i.e. off for reversing and rough roads.
 
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Drover

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#78
I have pretty much the same thoughts @Dean Anderson , I think my problem is with the new suspension which gave lift I have not enough travel in the front suspension now, plenty of compression but not enough drop so the WDH has sorted that but it isn't loading things up a lot as the tension isn't great compared to some who need a crane to lift the chains, with only 15mm drop at the hitch I'm happy.

Mind you the back of the ute has a fair bit of gear in it for long touring which all adds up.
I don't like the hitch and unhitch bit and I do think all vehicles if your going to tow need to upgrade suspension, WDH and bags on stock suspension is not good, the jobs only half done.
 
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Dean Anderson

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Feb 7, 2014
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Isaac Region
#79
OEM suspension is for city drivers that don't tow anything and built for comfort not function. How manufacturers rate a car astonishes me... Built for a load? Built for a bag of charf and a flagon of red........

The charf is for the horse to pull ya after the breakdown and the red is for you to get over your depression.
 
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DWWood

Active Member
Jun 26, 2016
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#80
G'day gents. On track to pick up the van this weekend and have never used a WDH, let alone towed a caravan before.

Is it simply just a case of my looking and measuring the sag once the van is on to determine if I need to fit the WDH or should I drive it down the road then fit it?